Present continuous (I am doing)

Have a look at the following example:

Sarah is in her car. She is on her way to work. She is driving to work.

This means, she is driving now, at the time of speaking. The action is not finished.

Am/is/are + -ing is the present continuous.

I am (= I’m) driving
he/she/it is (= he’s, etc.) working
we/you/they are (= we’re, etc.) doing, etc.

I am doing something = I’m in the middle of doing it; I’ve started doing it and I haven’t finished.

  • Please don’t make so much noise. I’m trying to work. (not I try to work)
  • “Where’s Mark?” “He’s having a shower. (not He has a shower)
  • Let’s go out now. It isn’t raining anymore. (not It doesn’t rain)
  • (at a party) Hi, Jane. Are you enjoying the party? (not Do you enjoy)
  • What’s all that noise? What’s going on? (=What’s happening?)

Sometimes the action isn’t happening at the time of speaking. For example:

Steve is talking to a friend on the phone. He says:

Steve is not reading the book at the time of speaking. He means that he has started it, but has not finished it yet. He is in the middle of reading it.

Some more examples:

  • Karen wants to work in Italy, so she’s learning Italian. (but perhaps she isn’t learning Italian at the time of speaking)
  • Some friends of mine are building their own house. They hope to finish it next summer.

You can use the present continuous with today / this week / this year etc. (periods around now)

  • You’re working hard today.
  • The company I work for isn’t doing well this year.

We use the present continuous when we talk about changes happening around now, especially with these verbs:

get    change    become    increase    rise    fall    grow    improve    begin    start

  • Is your English getting better? (not Does your English get better)
  • The population of the world is increasing very fast. (not increases)
  • At first, I didn’t like my job, but I’m beginning to enjoy it now. (not I begin)

Practise the present continuous

Complete the conversations.

1. A: I saw Brian a few days ago

B: Oh, did you? What’s he doing these days? (what / he / do)

A: He’s at university.

B: _____________________? (what / he / study)

A: Psychology.

B: _____________________ it? (he / enjoy)

A: Yes, he says it’s a very good course.

2. A: Hi, Nicola. How _____________________? (your new job / go)

B: Not bad. It wasn’t so good at first, but _____________________ better now. (it / get)

A: What about Daniel? Is he OK?

B: Yes, but _____________________ his work right now. (he / not / enjoy) He’s been in the same job for a long time and _____________________ to get bored with it. (he / begin)

Answers

1. A: I saw Brian a few days ago

B: Oh, did you? What’s he doing these days? (what / he / do)

A: He’s at university.

B: What’s he studying? (what / he / study)

A: Psychology.

B: Is he enjoying it? (he / enjoy)

A: Yes, he says it’s a very good course.

2. A: Hi, Nicola. How is your new job going? (your new job / go)

B: Not bad. It wasn’t so good at first, but it’s getting better now. (it / get)

A: What about Daniel? Is he OK?

B: Yes, but he is not enjoying his work right now. (he / not / enjoy) He’s been in the same job for a long time and he’s beginning to get bored with it. (he / begin)

Put the verb in the correct form, positive (I’m doing etc.) or negative (I’m not doing etc.).

  1. Please don’t make so much noise. I’m trying (I / try) to work.
  2. Let’s go out now. It isn’t raining (it / rain) any more.
  3. You can turn off the radio. _____________________ (I / listen) to it.
  4. Kate phoned me last night. She’s on holiday in France. _____________________ (she / have) a great time and doesn’t want to come back.
  5. I want to lose weight, so this week _____________________ (I / eat) lunch.
  6. Andrew has just started evening classes. _____________________ (he / learn) Japanese.
  7. Paul and Sally have had an argument. _____________________ (they / speak) to each other.
  8. _____________________ (I / get) tried. I need a rest.
  9. Tim _____________________ (work) today. He’s taken the day off.
  10. _____________________ (I / look) for Sophie. Do you know where she is?

Answers

  1. Please don’t make so much noise. I‘m trying (I / try) to work.
  2. Let’s go out now. It isn’t raining (it / rain) any more.
  3. You can turn off the radio. I’m not listening (I / listen) to it.
  4. Kate phoned me last night. She’s on holiday in France. She’s having (she / have) a great time and doesn’t want to come back.
  5. I want to lose weight, so this week I’m not eating (I / eat) lunch.
  6. Andrew has just started evening classes. He’s learning (he / learn) Japanese.
  7. Paul and Sally have had an argument. They’re not speaking (they / speak) to each other.
  8. I’m getting (I / get) tried. I need a rest.
  9. Tim isn’t working (work) today. He’s taken the day off.
  10. I’m looking (I / look) for Sophie. Do you know where she is?

Source: Murphy, R. English Grammar in Use. 4th Ed.

Download a chart with all 12 verb tenses and examples.

Download the A4 version

Download the US letter version

Prepositions Made Easy: Preposition Definitions for Location and Movement

Do you struggle with prepositions? Do English prepositions confuse you?

Well have no fear. In this article, you’re going to easily learn the definitions for the various prepositions related to movement and location.

Because prepositions don’t literally translate from one language to another, they can be one of the most difficult things for non-native English speakers to master.

But it doesn’t have to be difficult.

One reason prepositions can be difficult to wrap your head around [understand] is because it’s hard to visualize what they look like in your head.

However, prepositions related to direction CAN be demonstrated with images. So check out the image above (click to view at full size or Download the pdf). Then, for more information and examples, read the definitions below.

NOTE: All the links below will take you to an awesome song on youtube that gives you a real-life example of the preposition.

Preposition Definitions

1. In/inside – when something is in the interior of a 3 dimensional object.

2. On – when something is on top of an object or surface.

3. At – expressing location in a specific place.

  • She’s at the door.
  • Where are you at?

4. Near – a short distance away from (a place).

  • Do you live near here?
  • The restaurant is near the bakery.

5. Under – directly below (generally 3 with dimensional objects).

6. Over – directly on top of, but not touching (generally from one side to another).

  • In the high jump, you have to jump over the bar.
  • Instead of going to the side of the rock, he drove over it.

7. Below – directly underneath (generally with 2 dimensional objects).

  • Your stomach is below your chest.
  • The ocean floor is miles below the surface.

8. Above – on top up/over something, without touching it.

9. Round/around – on every side of.

1o. Through – moving in one side and out the other side.

  • The ball went through his legs.
  • The car went through the tunnel.

11. Among – surrounded by.

  • The strawberries are hidden among the trees.
  • In the RLE Facebook Group, you’re among friends.

12. Between – in the space between two objects.

  • The United States is located between Canada and Mexico.
  • The dog walked between us and lay down at our feet.

13. Behind – at the back/far side of something.

  • Look at the sunset behind you.
  • There’s a naked person behind the tree.

14. In front of – the opposite of behind, a position at the front part of something.

  • I’ll meet you in front of my house.
  • Wait for me in front of the supermarket.

15. Along – moving in a constant direction on (a path more or less horizontal).

16. Across – from one side to the other.

17. Up – toward the sky or higher place.

18. Down – toward the ground or lower place.

  • The sun is starting to go down.
  • Everything that goes up, must come down.

19. Opposite – have a position on the other or further side of something.

  • A large group of people gathered [came together] on the opposite side of the street.
  • Opposite the school is a church.

20. Onto – moving to a location on (the surface of something).

  • We got onto the train.
  • He jumped onto the rock.

21. Off – moving away and often down from.

  • He fell off the bed while he was sleeping.
  • He jumped off the horse.

22. Into – to become enclosed/surrounded by something else.

23. Out of  – moving away from.

  • Let’s get out of here. I’m tired.
  • He got out of the water.

24. Past – in front of or from one side to the other.

  • He walked past me without saying hello.
  • The man drove past while honking his horn.

25. Next to/by/beside – in or into a position immediately to one side of.

26. Against – in physical contact with something, generally supported by it.

  • When I’m tired, I rest my back against the wall.
  • He stood with his back against the door.

27. Over – expressing passage or movement across the top of something.

28. From—to – from—the point in space where something starts, to—the point in space where something ends.

  • He drove from his house to the store to get some fruit.
  • I’ll send it along with love from me to you.

29. Toward – in the direction of.

  • I walked toward the front door.
  • She’s walking toward me.

Source: http://reallifeglobal.com/preposition-definitions/